Tag Archives: Health

A plague on pollen and all other allergens

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In terms of being sensitive to, or even aware of, those mostly invisible foreign irritants which float around in our atmosphere, I led an idyllic childhood.  My brother suffered from recurring bouts of asthma and both my mother and father from seasonal allergies.  I, on the other hand, seemed to be immune to all such maladies.

That is until one fateful Spring day during my freshman year in college.  That was the day that Bobby Bumbles walked into my dorm room carrying a kitten.  His real name was Robert, but due to his proclivity to spontaneously disrupt the general welfare of those with whom he came into contact, Robert became known to all as Bobby Bumbles.  No doubt, he probably still is.

A perfect example of his impact on others was evidenced by his acquisition of the kitten.  No good can come from attempting to discern why he thought that having a kitten in a college dorm would be practical, much less a good idea.  There’s simply no reasonable explanation for that.  Nor is there an acceptable reason for why he began playing with the feline as he sat on my bed; rolling the kitten around, bouncing it on my blanket, and in the process dislodging copious amounts of cat hair, fur, and dander.

Within an hour, I began to feel as if someone had sprinkled tiny particles of sand under my eyelids, my breathing became labored, and a vile and noxious fluid began draining down the back of my throat.  That was the day that I learned that I was allergic to cats.  And I remain so to this day.

Thank you Bobby Bumbles, wherever you are.

I’m fairly sure that the initiation of my cat allergy also served as my personal Pandora’s Box in terms of the advent of other allergies.  Within a year or two, I found that I had become susceptible to various forms of pollen based hay fevers.

At first, my reactions to pollen seemed to occur on an every other year basis and were limited to short-term bouts of itchy and watering eyes, repetitious sneezing fits, and dull headaches.  But within a few years, I also began to develop nasal congestion, a scratchy throat, and tiny but incredibly itchy bumps on my fingers and hands.  A dermatologist told me that these bumps were known as vesicles, that they were related to hay fever, that they can develop within a very few minutes, last several weeks, and were essentially untreatable.

Did I mention that with my ever advancing age, my hay fever is no longer biennial, but now an annual affair?

As noted above, today’s pollen count is 10.1 – High.  I have no idea how that assessment is derived, nor do I want to have it explained.  I’m just glad that it’s less than the 11.0 – Extremely High levels that we’ve had here for the past three or four days.

img_0254I’ve tried using the common over-the-counter allergy medications with limited or no success.  These days, I tend to just stay indoors until the pollen counts subside. 

This has the added benefit of limiting my exposure to those other irritants in the environment such as urban sprawl, endless and unoccupied strip malls, traffic jams, and their basic root cause – people who have absolutely no clue how to drive a car!

Happy days!

 

Learning from Past Mistakes

Well now, it’s been entirely too long since my last blog post – which seems to be a common complaint among the WordPress faithful.  But one of the major problems with being retired and having a very large number of interests is in finding the time to satisfy the demands that all of those interests place on your schedule.

But I digress. The topic of today’s post came to me about a week ago as I was working out; something I now do 3 to 4 times per week.  I was doing my cardio workout, pedaling to beat the band on a LifeCycle and keeping my heart rate well up into the cardio range, when I noticed a news report on one of the 14 or so TV’s hanging from the ceiling just in front of me.

Through the magic of subtitles, I learned that medical researchers have now determined that the commonly held belief that there are health benefits to be gained by consuming one or two glasses of red wine per day is now believed to be without merit!  Shocking!

The reporter strongly implied that the belief that red wine consumption, in moderation, is good for you has possibly been the work of elements within the French government who are interested in promoting that nation’s wine industry.  Doubly shocking!

I’ve never been a big wine drinker, but if I do drink the stuff, it’s the red variety that I go for; so I’m not overly disturbed by this revelation.

All I can say is, “Don’t be funding any studies into the health effects of dark beer! ” Just leave all of those Stouts, Porters, and Brown Ales well enough alone.

Dr-adThis whole episode reminded me of some advertisements that I came across years ago during my college days.  I was holed up in the university library and for some reason, now lost in the mists of time, I was looking at old Life and Look magazines from the 1940’s and 50’s.  Particularly at the full page cigarette advertisements in which doctors, as in physicians and MDs, were extolling the benefits of smoking cigarettes!

It’s hard to believe in our sanitized and now virtually smoke-free world that doctors could have believed that smoking cigarettes, especially the brand that they personally preferred, was an activity to be so strongly promoted.  But there you have it.dentistreccomendedL

I wonder how long it will be before new research pops up which causes us to rethink our views on the use of tobacco, or the consumption of heavily sugar-coated breakfast cereals.

Hang on Fruit Loops, Sugar Pops, and Frosted Flakes; your day may yet come again!